Summary

Funding and Learning Opportunities | Possibilités de financement et d’apprentissage

Shared on behalf of Family Resolution Service, Courts Division, Manitoba Justice Funding Opportunity: From the Ground Up We would like to share the Department of Municipal and Northern Relations’ new community development grant opportunity called From the Ground Up – Safe Healthy Communities for All. Grants under the program will support initiatives in the areas […]

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Inuit Legal Clinic Stakeholder Summit

 Authored by Tasha Ellis, University of Manitoba, Faculty of Law articling student-at-law At this landmark summit, Inuit Elders, community members, and stakeholders from Nunavut and Manitoba were invited to gather on Treaty 1 territory at the University of Manitoba’s Faculty of Law, to learn, share information, and discuss the need for an Inuit-specific Legal Clinic

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Legal Information for Incarcerated Manitobans (LIIM) Initiative

By: Kirsten Wurmann – Librarian, Legal Information for Incarcerated Manitobans Initiative “Prison libraries play a fundamental role in guaranteeing rights, not only providinginmates with access to information about their legal rights as incarcerated personsbut also by providing the tools necessary to exercise these rights.” The Legal Information for Incarcerated Manitobans Initiative is a project of the

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“Cost of defending yourself” by David Dorson

By: April Lount, University of Manitoba, Student at the Faculty of Law The recent Law 360 article entitled “Cost of defending yourself” by David Dorson  provides a sobering perspective of the cost relationship to quality criminal defence and the severe consequences when you are not able to meet those costs. Dorson is a pen name, providing

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An Assessment of the Post-Hryniak Summary Judgement Rule in Alberta

By Joy Brailean, Student at the Faculty of Law, University of Alberta In Hryniak v Mauldin, the Supreme Court of Canada urged courts to optimize procedural mechanisms for improved access to justice. While fair adjudication is paramount to Canada’s civil justice system, excessive expense and delay can preclude equitable dispute resolution altogether. Balance must be

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Evaluating How Alberta Courts Have Issued Vexatious Litigant Orders After the Vexatious Litigant Order Trilogy

By Jessa Meyer*, Student at the Faculty of Law, University of Alberta A vexatious litigant order (“VLO”) is used to prevent a vexatious litigant from commencing or continuing proceedings in court, unless the litigant obtains permission from the Court to do so. In 2020, the cases of Jonsson v Lymer, Makis v Alberta Health Services,

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Transgender People’s Access to Justice in the Courts

By Mackenzie Coleman, Student at the Faculty of Law, University of Alberta Within the Canadian legal system, transgender people have faced a wide range of pressing and well-documented legal needs and yet, most of these needs remain unmet. Along with this, transgender people have historically, and continually, faced systematic access to justice barriers and regularly

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The Overlooked Danger of Using Digitization as a Solution to the Access to Justice Problem

By Rachel Poznikoff, Student at the Faculty of Law, University of Alberta With Covid-19 lockdowns came a necessary shift towards digital methods of pre-trial and trial procedures across Canada, and even as the world has resumed to a new normal, it does not appear as though these digital options are going anywhere. In Alberta, virtual

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The Behaviour of Defendants May Significantly Influence Whether the Alberta Court of Appeal Dismisses an Action for Delay

By Cassandra Paterson, Student at the Faculty of Law, University of Alberta In three recent decisions, the Alberta Court of Appeal (the “ABCA”) paid close attention to the defendants’ behaviour when deciding whether to dismiss a claim or action for delay under Rules 4.31 and 4.33 of the Alberta Rules of Court. Rules 4.31 and

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Can the Legislature Order Dismissal of a Case Against the Government? 

By Dr. Gerard Kennedy & Tasha Ellis 5185603 Manitoba Ltd et al v Government of Manitoba et al, 2023 MBCA 47 Provinces can, theoretically, abolish private law causes of action. They can even pass legislation to extinguish judgments. But can they constitutionally compel dismissal of a cause of action while in progress? That was the

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